Was Khamenei Reckless - Or Set Up? (Page 2 of 2)

As crazy as the Iranian regime can sound through its rhetoric, when it comes to protecting its interests, it‘s essentially rational and careful. Iran knows that it can’t afford a war against the United States. It also knows that further deterioration could mean more sanctions and further isolation, both of which would hurt the regime’s ability to sustain itself at home. This is more important to Khamenei's interests right now than the elimination of the Saudi Ambassador in Washington. 
 
The fact is that looking at Khamenei's background, such a reckless initiative as the one he is accused of is almost too radical, the costs too high for his regime. This is why it seems at least plausible that elements within the Iranian regime could have orchestrated this to hurt him, with the goal of eventually pushing him out of power. 
 
The Iranian regime is already fractured, and the business interests of many officials are being undermined by Khamenei's nuclear policies. Meanwhile, the children of former officials such as Intelligence Minister Ali Younesi, are reportedly in jail because of their opposition to the regime. Anyone who wants to hurt Khamenei from within would have plenty of reason to undertake such an initiative, especially as it would ultimately tar the supreme leader. 
 
The Iranian government has been a sponsor of terrorism for many years. But this claim is truly extraordinary. If true, Khamenei has either been extremely reckless, or is being set up by opposing elements within his regime. Time, and the evidence presented in court, will help us get close to the answer. 
Comments
11
Iqbal
November 20, 2011 at 22:23

Before commencing any war the US & it’s allies spread propoganda war whether it’s the Iraq war aimed to control gulf oil, Afghanistan and so on, while the naked truth is to take control of oil and to run it’s war factories. And now the focus is on Iran. God knows what the next turn could be? Would it be China or Japan? It would be the one which suits the needs of American election issues.

Captian America
November 7, 2011 at 15:12

Yes we have given Iran 15 years to come clean about there nuclear program and their time is up. The time for short talk and half measures has come to an end and The United States will take the stance it has always taken with Israel and the hand an glove “Full Support”. SO if Iran wishes to continue to Lie and insult the West and threaten Israel then Iran chooses the fate of Iraq and Libya and Nazi Germany and that is annihilation. He will be removed by force

Paul
November 1, 2011 at 15:59

The use of the word “wonting” is correct.

esculap
October 15, 2011 at 17:59

@mary…i don’t think they have short term memmory loss to sent agents all over and forget whom they sent where. they really aren’t that stupid.

Jason
October 15, 2011 at 02:20

It is obvious to anyone with a modicum of knowledge on middle east politics that this was not a qods attack – they are not that clumsy, and it serves no interest.

But for the american public, the allegation is believable and will be used to build up the case against the new public enemy no. 1, now that alqaeda and taliban are on the wane.

David
October 14, 2011 at 11:55

>> Certainly, if this evidence is found wonting

“Wonting”? Try “wanting.”

Cyrus
October 14, 2011 at 11:06

Mary; sorry to disappoint you, but these days you don’t need to send agents all over the world, a little co-operation among countries mean that you could buy info and favor without sending your own agents all over the globe. And while we are at this topic, with all those videos of movies like mission impossible and etc. why would a government try to bomb a restaurant when they can use a quieter method ??

Mary
October 14, 2011 at 02:19

A reply to Carl : maybe they sent many agents to many places at the same time , they lost track.:) Their agents are working in Saudi AlQatif, in Bahrain , in Iraq, in wall street , in London, in Syria, in Cairo in Kuwait, etc. etc. Besides oppressing their own people. Surely, they lost track.

MAY
October 14, 2011 at 02:11

I noticed that most American journalists and tweeps (Alphaleah ) & co. Are trying hard to analyze the Iranian plot against the Saudi Embassadore and hinting that it might be orchestrated from USA intelligence. I wonder , why these journalists are defending Iran and finding excecuses ? How come they are trying to rational what happened? Why only with Iran? STRANGE. Why they rush and adopt all lies said about Monarchies and monarchs without proofs , why repeating what Iranian Hezballouh agents in The Gulf states are saying without checking with the moderates in these states. Can I believe or even think that these journalist or PR agencies are paid by Iran ? Or they are really misled ?

carl
October 13, 2011 at 21:00

If this was legit it is indicative that Quds needs to improve its hiring standards. This is a keystone cops account that doesn’t make any sense in terms of Irans history or al-Quds. Fisrt off Quds has no history of hiring unnamed and unvetted criminals to carry out political assassinations. They historically have used their own people or parties under their control (e.g., who have gone throught the training camp system). Second it makes no sense whatever to risk a very valuable asset (e.g., an Iranian with a U.S. passport – even if he was a fool) to go trapsing into Mexico looking for a hitman. It has all the sophistication of the housewife who hires a hitman to kill hubby and the hitman is invariably a cop. If this was real, and Quds changed their spots and were using Zepa’s for something this sensitive, they logically would have vetted the guy first and sent him up to meet the Iranian with the U.S. Passport, not risk that guy on this sort of sillyness. I don’t know what was going on but the public version of this does not make any sense at all.

Leonard R.
October 13, 2011 at 17:20

@Meir Javedanfar
“Was Khameini Reckless – or Set-up?”
_________

Set-up.

This appears to have been a really stupid plan.

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