Japan Should Follow - Germany

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As a Jew who escaped Nazi Germany as a child in 1935, I have a lifelong interest in the ways nations deal with their pasts. I am closely following developments in Japan, in particular the moves to revise Japanese textbooks in a nationalistic direction, the debate about the implications of Prime Minister Shinzo Abe’s visit to the Yasukuni Shrine, and, above all, steps to turn Japan’s military from a strictly defensive one into one with “normal” capabilities. Abe is hardly the first or only public leader to move in this direction. As Jacob Heilbrunn, the editor of the National Interest, points out, “Nationalists in Japan have never really conceded that Tokyo did anything wrong before or during the war. . . . You will be hard-pressed to find much, if any, mention of Japan’s wartime alliance with Nazi Germany. . . . Japan emerges as a power that was simply trying to defend its own interests. . . . Nationalists also bridle at the moral guilt that outsiders have tried to affix to Japan, whether it is the 1937 invasion of Nanking, which they argue has been falsely turned into a genocidal act, or the use of so-called ‘comfort women’ in Korea.”

I hence suggested at a recent press conference that Japan should send 200 public intellectuals and political leaders to Germany to learn how a nation can come to terms with the darkest parts of its history. Germany gradually came to fully acknowledge the evils of the Nazi regime, made amends when possible (e.g., by paying “reparations” to surviving victims), and made extensive mea culpas and apologies. Above all, it has instituted extensive, elaborate, and effective educational programs in its schools—and military—to ensure that Germany will never, ever again engage in the kind of horrific, barbarous conduct that took place during World War II. Today’s Germans—while also seeking a place for their nation as a “normal” member of the international community—have made it part of their DNA to reject xenophobia and racism. None of this happened in Japan. All of these steps should. Instead, it seems to be moving in the opposite direction.

There are basically two schools of thought as to where the international community ought to go from here. One holds that we should not make too much of the revisionists’ gestures, which are said to be merely minor political maneuvers of a far from formidable public leader. Moreover, according to this line of thinking, Japan’s military buildup and reinterpretation of its constitution are steps the nation is entitled to take now that two generations have passed since WWII.

And according to this school of thought, although the United States should continue to call on Abe and his associates to take into account the sensibilities of other nations, it is important to focus on the fact that Japan is destined to play a major role in “counter balancing” China. Moreover, Japan’s military buildup can be viewed as a welcome form of burden sharing in a period during which the Pentagon is under considerable budgetary pressures. While it is rarely stated publicly, U.S. State Department officials privately admit that the United States may have to put up with “unfortunate” comments by Abe because Japan’s contributions to core U.S. interests in the region are expected to grow substantively.

The other school of thought holds that Japan will shed even more of its pacifistic feathers and become more nationalistic and antagonistic towards China. In response, China, which is still smarting from the way it feels its people were abused and humiliated by Japan, will react with a wave of nationalism and mobilization of its own. American allies, especially South Korea and Singapore, are troubled by the Japanese developments, straining U.S. alliances in the region. Above all, there is the danger that Japan will involve the United States in a military conflict started by confrontations over a matter of limited importance such as whether Japan or China will own the Senkaku/Diaoyu Islands. (The New York Times reports that both sides are “scrambling their fighters in the East China Sea every day.”)

It is impossible to foretell how far the current nationalist wave, still rather limited, will carry Japan. One should note, though, that there are signs that the Western precepts of human rights and democracy were never deeply absorbed by Japan. This is evident in the poor ways it treats minorities and immigrants; its troubling record with respect to the rights of women, the disabled, and animals; and its low levels of governmental transparency and candor, as was recently demonstrated in the government’s  treatment of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. None of these bode well for the future of Japan’s foreign policy.

The United States and its allies in the region might find it less tempting to make allowances for Japan’s revisionist moves and be more willing to use whatever leverage they command to help Japan follow in Germany’s footsteps in dealing with the current foreign policy implications of its past if they realized that China is not seeking first to dominate the region and then to replace the United States as the global power. There is no reason to believe that China seeks to impose its regime on other nations, invade Japan, or occupy other nations on its border. China’s military buildup is starting from a very low base. Its swelling domestic problems, including a slowing economy, major environmental challenges, an aging population, and rising social tensions, are likely to absorb most of whatever economic resources it can marshal.

True, if China will be faced with increasing military buildups by its number one nemesis, Japan, and by other nations on its border (spurred by the U.S. as is occurring in Vietnam and the Philippines) and more of a U.S. military pivot to Southeast Asia that actually rather minimal effort seen so far – China’s own hawkish factions may increase their sway. However, for now it seems all involved, not least the Japanese people, would be better off if Japan were to follow Germany’s example and come to terms with its past rather than continue to deny the atrocities Japan committed during WWII and stop seeking to re-glorify the darkest parts of its history.

Amitai Etzioni is a university professor and professor of international relations at The George Washington University. He served as a senior adviser to the Carter White House and taught at Columbia University, Harvard University, and the University of California at Berkeley. His latest book is Hot Spots: American Foreign Policy in a Post-Human-Rights World.

Comments
40
earthfield2014
February 10, 2014 at 09:29

In 1930′s, Japan followed Germany in international politics and it was a huge mistake.
Japan has learnt a good lesson from history so that it will never be aligned with Germany.

RisingSun
February 10, 2014 at 11:41

It is true. The Japanese Navy had closer relationships with British Navy, while the Army had the relationships with Germany. Back in the day though, the Russian threat was bigger problem, and Japan needed some support from the European side. Either way, Japan’s fate has already decided when Japanese leaders chose to cut the tie with League of Nations.

ewakorn
February 8, 2014 at 07:09

The analogy between Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan in WWII is flawed.

Imperial Japan committed more atrocities than Nazi did during WWII.

For example, Hilter dared not use his chemical weapon even though Germany had plenty in stock. But Tojo never hesitated to apply it extensively in the battlefield. Until today Japan is still trying to help clean up its chemical weapoon stockpiled in China from WWII era.

RisingSun
February 8, 2014 at 19:54

Chemical weapons like Riot Control Agent weren’t banned until 1997. I think CCP did use them too to contain the anti-Japan riot in 2012.

Andy D.
March 16, 2014 at 10:17

Im’ sure Unit731 was not just making some “riot control agent”. They were making biological and chemical weapons that would kill millions of people.

MYK
February 9, 2014 at 20:19

Really? I saw the list of worst countries in the 20th & 21st centuries for killing civilians. Tojo of Japan was listed 5th for killing 5 million civilians from 1937 to 1945, while Hitler’s Germany was listed number 2 as killing 12 million civilians during WW2.

Can you guess which country is listed number one in the 20th & 21st century for killing anywhere from 38 million to 78 million civilians (mostly during peacetime) on the list? If you said Russia, that would be wrong, as it was Mao Tzedong, Deng Xiaoping, Jiang Zemin, & Hu Jintao of China from 1928 to 1989 who holds the world record for purging, slaughtering, and killing civilians at a whopping 78 million deaths by the Chinese.

This is why China gets no sympathy from me regarding the atrocities of Japan in WW2, when China’s leaders have killed over 15 times more civilians then Tojo of Japan ever did!

Lie all you want, as it won’t change the facts!

sfphoto
February 15, 2014 at 05:11

@MYK:

“Mao Tzedong, Deng Xiaoping, Jiang Zemin, & Hu Jintao of China from 1928 to 1989 who holds the world record for purging, slaughtering, and killing civilians at a whopping 78 million deaths by the Chinese.”

The Great Leap Forward resulted in a famine that caused the UNNATURAL DEATHS of tens of millions of peasants. However, that is a POLICY FAILURE of Communist ideology specifically collectivized agriculture and peasant mobilization.

The Irish Potato Famine is likewise a byproduct of POLICY FAILURE of the British Crown which resulted in the UNNATURAL DEATHS of one-eight of the population of Ireland and the migration of another one-fourth.

Both the Great Leap Forward and the Irish Potato Famine can not be equated with the European Holocaust perpetrated by the German Nazis or the Asian Holocaust carried by the Imperial Japanese Army during WWII.
The former were GREAT FAMINES due to POLICY FAILURES while the latter were GENOCIDAL WARS planned, organized and waged by Imperialist States against foreign countries.

RisingSun
February 8, 2014 at 03:49

If this author is comparing Nazi Germany and Japan, or Jewish and Chinese during WW2, it’s just so naïve and ignorant. The biggest difference is that Nazi Germany was acted upon its philosophy of racial supremacy, but Japan was fighting for freedom of the nation and the entire minority races, at the time the whole world expect Japan was colonized by Euro-America. The author should know Japanese efforts like Chiune Sugihara, the Vice-Council of Lithuania, who helped six thousands of Jewish refugees to escape from the Nazi rules. The alliance with Germany was nothing more than the struggle to keep Soviet at bay.

I don’t deny that the “incident” had happened in Nanking. In what scale, no one knows but the commander Iwane Matsui, who resigned immediately after the fall of Nanking, wrote the reason of his resignation on his diary that “the shameful acts” of Japanese soldiers took place despite his order, which he wrote 10 burglaries and 7 rapes happened during the 7 weeks of the occupation. Not 300,000. Even Auschwitz could only process 700 bodies a day. To kill 300,000 and burn them so there would be no sign of mass-murdering, you need the equivalent of 52 Auschwitz-size facilities. Japan had none. What effort do we need to dig to hide 300,000 bodies in 7 weeks, while you have to guard and secure the city at the same time?

At the time, Japan didn’t have a full capability of the weapon manufacturing and indeed 65% of weapons used to fight at Nanking were supplied by the US and UK. The export ban against Japan was already openly discussed that the congresses in both counties, and the last thing Japan wanted to do was to create the bad reputation. Four months before Nanking, the Japanese Army sent the open letter to its soldiers and Chinese that anyone disarmed or captured should be treated accordingly, and no like Nazi, there is no orders or guidelines had ever publish that Japan must exterminate Chinese or anything regarding the genocide.

Comfort women? No, no Japanese is denying about the existence but they were simply the professional camp followers as the US Intelligence reported in 1944, after they captured bunch of Korean prostitutes. http://bit.ly/1kQFRGd

This article just sounds so stupid I really have to start correcting words by words… Reparations? It’s already done. Apologies? Done. Effective educational programs in its schools? I don’t even think you have even read Japanese textbooks before. Don’t waste your efforts because the research had already been done at Stanford. http://bit.ly/1o1jxvV

Japan is not re-visioning its history as CCP often tells you. Japan is simply standing against the false accusation. If you ever watched the propaganda film “Battle of China” from Francis Capra in 1944, it says the number of the dead were 40,000, not mentioning how these 40,000 were dead. How was that revised to 300,000? Even Chiang Kai-Shek, the commander of Chinese Army who cowardly fled a few days before the fall of Nanking, stated that things like Massacre had never took places in his memoir in 1966. The current situations is like you bumped on to someone’s car from the rear side, and you have apologized the paid for the fix for the rear bumper, but the victim started accusing you for breaking the front lights or car radio.

Japan will say what we need to say, but you should be ashamed for yourself for blindly accepting one-sided claim and being the CCP radio tower. Maybe you should advocate for the fellow Jews to stop going to Jerusalem because the city and the temple stands on bodies of those ancient non-believers that Jews had exterminated in the name of the god. Hypocrisy and ignorance is the crime itself to humankind.

redstar
February 8, 2014 at 11:23

William Frederick Halsey, Jr. “Before we’re through with them, the Japanese language will be spoken only in hell”

RisingSun
February 8, 2014 at 19:50

…and a kid in Jimmy Kimmel Show said “Kill everyone in China”. Your point?

SinkingSun
February 8, 2014 at 12:13

Thanks for writing this. As I have said before, nothing better than a real Japanese writing this kind of things. You just confirm the charges of the Chinese and the Koreans. Keep posting here. It is priceless.

RisingSun
February 8, 2014 at 19:46

You don’t need to be so sarcastic just because you aren’t even capable to debate. Don’t feel ashamed of yourself, please.

Hollifield
February 9, 2014 at 01:13

For what had happened in Nanking, there are countless cruel photos and personal memoirs from WWII Japanese soldiers and western diplomats on the Internet. Something bad really happened. It is not helpful for Japan to gain international respect if some Japanese such as Risingsun keep neglecting those evidences and show not remorse (or briefly show little remorse but immediately change the focus to deny wrongdoings). It took two world wars for Germany to think and behave in the way it is. Japan has only experienced one WW. That’s probably why Japan has not been behaving like the Germany after WWII, but behaving like the Germany after WWI.

RisingSun
February 9, 2014 at 19:47

Can you read? I’m not denying that “incident” had happened but not “genocide”. If you strip out all those forged photo, propaganda, and non cross-examined testimonies, what will be left as facts? Japan will accept and acknowledge everything Japan did, but will not give in to the false accusations.

Andy D.
March 16, 2014 at 10:32

This whole comment was made based on distortion of history. Sound exacly like history revisionists in Japan.
When a Japanese calls Nanking massacre an “incident” that only involved few rapes and killings, you know something is wrong. I dare any of these shameless Japanese right-wingers to ask the victims of the massacre.
About comfort women issue, these people always bring up that document in 1944, but they ignore the fact that few Korean prostitutes can’t deny the enslavement of hundreds of thousands of Korean and Chinese women. It’s like saying “there is no rape victims in Japan because Japan has prostitutes”

MYK
February 7, 2014 at 19:38

The professor has written that “There is no reason to believe that China seeks to impose its regime on other nations, invade Japan, or occupy other nations on its border.”

Right! Except for those constant LoC violations by Chinese army forces into India’s Arunachal Pradesh territorial dispute. The Philippines Mischief Reef, Scarborough shoal, and now the PLAN invading James shoal of the Philippines. Invasion of Vietnam by China in 1979, followed by attack by China in the Paracel islands in 1988, or the constant detention of Vietnamese fishing boats inside Vietnam’s own 12-mile territorial waters by the PLAN today. China has over 2000 offensive missiles and over 2200 fighters and bombers poised to strike Taiwan at this very moment! Then again, the Chinese violated the territorial waters of Palau in 2012 in which Palauan coast guard shot a Chinese spy inside Palau’s 12-mile sovereign territorial waters, and the rest of the Chinese crew blew up their spy ship rather than let it be boarded by Palauan coast guard!

Guess the words ‘Oil & Gas’ , ‘Fisheries’ , ‘Core interests’ , ‘Nine Dash line’, ‘Freedom of Navigation’ , ‘Freedom of Over-flight’ or that not one single United Nations member state in Asia supports China’s claims in the East and South China seas is addressed by the professor!

redstar
February 8, 2014 at 11:27

It is a God given right for Chinese to invade and occupy Japan.

Ted
February 11, 2014 at 15:05

Oh please. India invaded and annexed South Tibet in 1951, four years after its independence. In 1987, India renamed South Tibet to Arunachal Pradesh.

Mike1959
February 7, 2014 at 15:36

Is this Chinese article?
So stupid!
This is untrue.
Abe didn’t say that.
Since there are some differences of expression between Japanese and a foreign language,foreign country’s media have made untrue reports.
For this reason, the Japanese government has been misunderstood about many issues until now.
If you think that my talk is a lie, please compare the Japanese original text of Prime Minister Abe’s discourse with the foreign country’s original text of news.

Hollifield
February 7, 2014 at 14:57

Good insights. Both Japan and China seem to have a mentality of denying past mistakes. It may take another generation for them to brace the western methodologies and then start to live happily with others. On the other hand, Taiwan has been doing well in managing relationships. Taiwan’s humble way of treating others is a good solution for Japan and China.

iwishitweretrue
February 7, 2014 at 13:23

Good article. The US has missed Japan’s aggressive shift to the Right and have missed the point that Abe is a loose canon, trying to militarize a conscienceless Japan again, which would be very very dangerous. Japan murdered 20 million people in China, before and during WW2, and carried out numerous atrocities and had a Josef Mengele unit – called Unit 731. Abe’s deliberate ignoring of Joe Biden and his deliberate visit to the Yasukuni Shrine is very worrying – as it shows Abe is trying to spark Japan into aggressive war mode. A Japanese journalist writes: “From the Sino-Japanese War to the Asia-Pacific War the noblest virtue was to die in battle for the emperor, be enshrined as a god at Yasukuni Shrine, and be the recipient of the emperor’s visits. Yasukuni Shrine was a religious and military facility indispensable for the prosecution of aggressive war.” The US needs to co-opertae with China and South Korea to reign in Abe’s Japanese militarism, and pressurise Abe into apologising for Japan’s unilateral nationalision of the historically Chinese Diaoyu Islands, and to negotiate their future peacefully. I suspect the lightweights at the US foreign dept are still in a mess – as they’ve accused China of untoward aggression for patrolling its own hsitorical Daioyu Islands and have done nothing concrete to stop Japan’s militarism. Furthermore, these lightweights have ignored 2000 years of China’s history in the South China Sea and have tried to say that the US has a say in what happens in the region – which is nonsense. These types of ignorant officials with not only destablise the area which could lead to war but they also give poor countries like the Phillipines false hope which encourages them to try and steal areas which are not historically theirs, rather than to sit down and negotiate their future with China on a one to one basis.

HEROnotHITO
February 7, 2014 at 12:56

Japan IS following the steps Germany took. Not today’s Germany though, but Nazi Germany.

Pbot
February 7, 2014 at 12:46

American’s are going to lets Abe loose. It won’t be the first time the US supported right-wing nationalist factions in a country. It’s like the Truman doctrine. Aside from Japan, it happened in Greece, Turkey, Philippines, Indonesia, multiple Latin American states, and what have you. Most of these examples were countries ruled by corrupt dictatorships that were or are puppets.

jamawns
February 7, 2014 at 10:01

Can you answer following VERY BASIC questions?
I appreciate your answers and understandings in advance.

Alleged Nanjing Massacre and FAKE OF NANJING have resulted in VERY BASIC 10 questions.
Imperial Japan had occupied Nanjing on Dec.13, 1937.
[Q1]Why did the population increase within a month between the incident from 200,000 (Nov.28 1937, Dec.18 1937, Dec.21 1937) to 250,000 (Jan.14 1938)?
[Q2]Where were the killed 300,000 innocent Chinese dead bodies?
[Q3]Why did many Chinese citizens come back to Nanjing after Imperial Japan occupied the city?

jamawns
February 7, 2014 at 09:58

Alleged Nanjing Massacre and FAKE OF NANJING have resulted in VERY BASIC 10 questions.
Imperial Japan had occupied Nanjing on Dec.13, 1937.
[Q1]Why did the population increase within a month between the incident from 200,000 (Nov.28 1937, Dec.18 1937, Dec.21 1937) to 250,000 (Jan.14 1938)?
[Q2]Where were the killed 300,000 innocent Chinese dead bodies?
[Q3]Why did many Chinese citizens come back to Nanjing after Imperial Japan occupied the city?
[Q4] Were the 572 crime cases really committed by Japanese?
Security Committee reported 572 crime cases(murder 94, rape 243, plunder 201, arson 34) of Japanese soldiers, but only one Chinese crime case(sneak thief) for a month from Nanjing-fall to the time when Nanjing Police Agency was organized. But, for a month from then Police Agency arrested about 500 Chinese crime cases.
[Q5] Why did KMT NOT condemn Japanese army about it at all?
KMT held about 300 press conferences in Hangkow for a year from Nanjing fall. But why didn’t correspondents ask any questions about the massacre at all?
[Q6]Why did China paid money to Harold John Timperley, an Australian, for writing the Japan’s atrocity story to a book, according to Tseng Hsu-pai’s autobiography?
[Q7]Why could China NOT prove the murder of 340,000 when the Tokyo Trial was opened?
[Q8]Why did Mao NOT mention any of them at the international media conferences from 1937 to 1938?
[Q9]Why did CCP NOT write anything about the massacre on textbooks till 1981 at all?
[Q10]Why did China fabricate 143 pictures in the Nanjing Museum?

Eddard1
February 7, 2014 at 07:42

The thing is Japan had always been apologizing, attempting to come to terms with its past for decades.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_war_apology_statements_issued_by_Japan

Each time however, the apology was rebuffed for different reasons. It’s always easier to be in the victim role and diplomatically its a card that’s hard to give up. However, after decades of apologizing, and nothing changing, many Japanese got tired of the constant apolegetic stance of the government, while being walked all over diplomatically due to this stance. Also, since the dialogue stops at the rebuffed apologies, the relationship never developed. This led to the current nationalism of today.

The difference with Germany is that Israel took the opportunities when Germany apologized or expressed regret as opportunites to build the relationship, not constantly rejecting Gerany’s attempts at reconciliation. At the same time, there are powerful films like “Forgiving Dr. Mengele” that showcases a Jewish survivor of the Holocaust forgiving the Nazis, unlike in China, where the media consistently makes films to incite anger towards Japan.

In a sense, “Japan learn from Germany” is wrong, it should be “China learn from Israel.”

Bankotsu
February 7, 2014 at 13:20

Israel is a small country, I doubt that China can learn much from it. China’s problems are of another scale.

tddcd
February 7, 2014 at 14:20

More like after each time Japan made the apologies some fool from Japan ( some of them in prominent positions too) jumps out and make statements that undermined the apology.

One doesn’t have to look further than this comment section to find them. Convenient, aren’t they? LOL

Hollifield
February 7, 2014 at 15:16

Sorry to see that many Japanese seems not to understand that, “Action is louder than words.” Whatever you say doesn’t count, if you keep doing the opposite. You might have made apologies a few times, but if you turned around and denied war crimes, all your prior apologies get nullified. People judge you not based on what you say, but on what you do. So, if you keep visiting the Yasukuni shrine, you will only make people resent you more. If you knock down the shrine, you will get immediate respect.

someone
February 7, 2014 at 06:32

It’s absurd how this article seems to completely ignore that China is already more nationalists and hawkish than any other country in the area.
>One should note, though, that there are signs that the Western precepts of human rights and democracy were never deeply absorbed by Japan.
At least Japan isn’t colonising any country right now, unlike a certain Jewish State… Or do you want to say that Chinese and Koreans should get a “blame” visa like Israeli did? I guess all the “follow Germany’s example” boils down to that in the end, unconditional passivity like the one Germany shows in the UN when it comes to Israel.

Canadian
February 7, 2014 at 05:17

A good editorial analysis. Thumb up!

cowboy directives
February 7, 2014 at 01:32

The directives from the cowboy to the samurais, I bet, were not to follow Germany’s footstep, but for the militaristic Japan to deny history and fortify the pains in the necks to China and Korea. Permanent national conflicts is the national interest for the cowboy.

The militarist samurai are happy to say anything and do everything in that effect even saying the Chinese and Korean had asked the imperial samurais to invade and conscripted their women…

Bankotsu
February 6, 2014 at 23:02

‘To get from that to “China is not seeking to dominate the region” is truly bizarre.’

I think China is trying to create buffer zones against the U.S. encirclement and pivot. They are not aimed at dominance.

Humble man
February 6, 2014 at 21:06

I completely agree with your point of view, you should send a copy to Tony Abbott, Obama and Abe, tell them to digest them. Good on you, we need more educated person like you.

jamawns
February 7, 2014 at 10:04

Alleged Nanjing Massacre and FAKE OF NANJING have resulted in VERY BASIC 10 questions.
Imperial Japan had occupied Nanjing on Dec.13, 1937.
[Q1]Why did the population increase within a month between the incident from 200,000 (Nov.28 1937, Dec.18 1937, Dec.21 1937) to 250,000 (Jan.14 1938)?
[Q2]Where were the killed 300,000 innocent Chinese dead bodies?
[Q3]Why did many Chinese citizens come back to Nanjing after Imperial Japan occupied the city?
[Q4] Were the 572 crime cases really committed by Japanese?
Security Committee reported 572 crime cases(murder 94, rape 243, plunder 201, arson 34) of Japanese soldiers, but only one Chinese crime case(sneak thief) for a month from Nanjing-fall to the time when Nanjing Police Agency was organized. But, for a month from then Police Agency arrested about 500 Chinese crime cases.
[Q5] Why did KMT NOT condemn Japanese army about it at all?
KMT held about 300 press conferences in Hangkow for a year from Nanjing fall. But why didn’t correspondents ask any questions about the massacre at all?
[Q6]Why did China paid money to Harold John Timperley, an Australian, for writing the Japan’s atrocity story to a book, according to Tseng Hsu-pai’s autobiography?
[Q7]Why could China NOT prove the murder of 340,000 when the Tokyo Trial was opened?
[Q8]Why did Mao NOT mention any of them at the international media conferences from 1937 to 1938?
[Q9]Why did CCP NOT write anything about the massacre on textbooks till 1981 at all?
[Q10]Why did China fabricate 143 pictures in the Nanjing Museum?

jamawns
February 7, 2014 at 10:06

Alleged Nanjing Massacre and FAKE OF NANJING have resulted in VERY BASIC 10 questions.
Imperial Japan had occupied Nanjing on Dec.13, 1937.
[Q1]Why did the population increase within a month between the incident from 200,000 (Nov.28 1937, Dec.18 1937, Dec.21 1937) to 250,000 (Jan.14 1938)?
[Q2]Where were the killed 300,000 innocent Chinese dead bodies?
[Q3]Why did many Chinese citizens come back to Nanjing after Imperial Japan occupied the city?

Jen Whitten
February 6, 2014 at 19:38

“China is not seeking to dominate the region”

So what is the nine-dashed line and the Senkaku ADIZ about?. What is the PLAN’s ‘First Island Chain’ miltary doctrine about? What are the Paracel, Spratly, James Shoal, Scarborough Shoal, Pratas, Macclesfield Bank disputes about? Why do Chinese troops mount repeated incursions into Arunachal Pradesh?

To get from that to “China is not seeking to dominate the region” is truly bizarre.

fgt
February 6, 2014 at 22:17

These arent evidence of China’s will to dominate the region. These are evidence of China’s deep distrust in the USA and their hegemony in the area.

ADIZ are defensive in nature, as it is aimed at identifying potential hostile aircrafts that are approaching your air-space, and China’s nine-dash line as well as her first island chain doctrine is aimed at enforcing surveillance and control over vital waterways and lines of communication, lest the US and her allies attempt to cut China off from her vital energy and resource lines and sentence her people to starvation.

China is a great power now. She cannot longer rely on the mercy of the US-led world order and risk arbitrary attacks on her national security by an increasingly war-mongering USA who seeks to plant the tree of the “new american century” by watering it with the blood of all she deems to be “enemy of the free world”.

America’s declaration of cold war against China that is long predating the island issue and has actually begun in 2001 already when that US P-3C spied on China’s South China Sea base of Hainan, is the source of China’s recent assertive behavior.

China understands that the US is a wolf who will kill and eat her the moment she shows weakness.

KC
February 7, 2014 at 01:30

Your arguments only hold water when you argue versus the USA. But how does China describe keeping Filipino fishermen from fishing within their own economic zone? What does China call cutting the cables of a Vietnamese boat doing its business in its own waters? The truth of the matter is China is quite alone in in all this because she is the main aggressor in every complaint of the countries around her periphery. A “great power”? Naaah. Powerful maybe. Great? Try fighting in two ocean wars simultaneously for freedom, helping people ravaged by natural calamities instead of giving paltry sums out of sheer pettiness, doing much to keep world peace, giving its own people the freedom to choose who their leaders are while helping peoples of others countries enjoy the same freedoms–that is greatness. What has China done? Step out of China for a while, breathe in the free air that clears your thinking and you’ll realise what many other Chinese who have had a chance to study and live outside of China: that your “great” country is only as great as the communal brainwashing that happens there.

smartyass says
February 6, 2014 at 22:42

First, try to understand and find out where Christmas Island is, preferably direct from Tony Abbot.

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