How China Plans to Use the Su-35
A Sukhoi Su-35 fighter
Image Credit: REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol

How China Plans to Use the Su-35

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A senior executive at Russia’s state arms export company, Rosoboronexport, has said that Russia will sign a contract to sell the advanced Su-35 jet to China in 2014, while confirming that the deal is not on track to be finished in 2013. This is unlikely to be the last word on the matter – the negotiations have dragged on since 2010, and have been the subject of premature and contradictory announcements before – but it is a strong indication that Russia remains interested in the sale. For the time being, China’s interest in the new-generation fighter is worth examining for what it reveals about the progress of homegrown military technology and China’s strategy for managing territorial disputes in the South China Sea. If successful, the acquisition could have an immediate impact on these disputes. In addition to strengthening China’s hand in a hypothetical conflict, the Su-35’s range and fuel capacity would allow the People’s Liberation Army Naval Air Force (PLANAF) to undertake extended patrols of the disputed areas, following the model it has used to pressure Japan over the Diaoyu/Senkaku islands.

The Su-35 is not the first Sukoi to pique the interest of the Chinese military. As previously reported in The Diplomat, the Sukoi-30MKK, and the Chinese version, the J-16, have been touted by the Chinese military as allowing it to project power into the South China Sea.

Previous reports in Chinese and Russian media in June of this year pointed toward a deal having been reached over a sale of Su-35 multi-role jets, but were not viewed as official, given more than a year’s worth of contradictory reports in Chinese and Russian media. At one point, Russian sources claimed that the sale had gone through, only to be categorically refuted by the Chinese Ministry of Defense. Nevertheless, in January both governments paved the way for an eventual sale by signing an agreement in principle that Russia would provide the Su-35 to China.

A big question remaining is the number of aircraft that China will purchase. China’s Global Times reported this summer that a group of Chinese representatives were in Moscow evaluating the Su-35, and would begin acquiring a “considerable number” of the advanced jets. Whether that means that China will purchase more than 48, as mentioned in press statements a year ago, is unclear. Evidence of continued negotiation for the jets indicates a strong desire within the Chinese military to acquire the Sukhoi fighters.

Chinese aviation is still reliant in many ways on Russia. Media attention has focused on China’s domestic development programs, including stealth fighter-bombers and helicopters. The advance of Chinese aviation capabilities is by now a common theme, with every month seeming to bring new revelations about its programs. While the ability to manufacture and perform design work on these projects represents significant progress, “under the hood” these aircraft often feature Russian engines. China continues to try to copy or steal Russian engine technology because of a strong preference for building systems itself. In fact, purchasing the Su-35 does not reflect a shift in the preferences of the Chinese military leadership. Buying the Su-35 reflects the delicate position China now finds itself in, as both a large purchaser and producer of primarily Russian-style weapons. Though self-reliance has always been important to China, it has been superseded by the strategic need to acquire cutting-edge weapons systems quickly. According to data from the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI), beginning in 1991, China began purchasing the Su-27 long-range fighter jet (an older relative of the Su-35). The data is searchable here.

Russia understandably became upset when its star export appeared as an indigenously produced J-11 in China – without a licensing agreement. Russian media was previously reporting that Russia had chosen not to sell the jet over fears that it would be copied in turn and become yet another export item for China, further undercutting Russia’s own economically vital arms business. It appears that now Russia is trying to balance its fear of being undercut by Chinese copying with its desire (or need) to sell weapons.

Viewing the purchase of the Su-35 through the lens of China’s strategic needs and events, like the recent territorial spats with its neighbors, provides a useful perspective on just why China is so eager to acquire the Sukhoi jet.

Simply put, the Su-35 is the best non-stealth fighter in the world today. Though stealth has come to dominate Western aircraft design, in terms of China’s needs, other factors take precedence. Even more surprisingly, superiority in air-to-air combat is not the Su-35’s key selling point. while the Su-35 gives the Chinese military a leg up versus the F-15s and other aircraft fielded by neighbors like Japan, the advanced Russian jet does not add significant new capabilities to conflict areas like the Taiwan Strait. Large numbers of interceptors and multi-role jets like the J-10 could easily be deployed over the Strait, or to areas near Japan like the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands. The advantage of the Su-35 rather lies in its speed and ample fuel tanks. Like the Su-27, the Su-35 was created to patrol Russia’s enormous airspace and to be able to meet incoming threats far away from Russia’s main urban areas. The People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) faces similar problems.

The South China Sea is just such a problem. A vast area of 1.4 million square miles (2.25 million square kilometers), China’s claims, as demarcated by the famous “nine-dashed line,” pose challenges for the People’s Liberation Army’s (PLA) current fighters. Currently, land-based PLANAF fighters, can conduct limited patrols of the sea’s southern areas, but their fuel capacity severely restricts the time they can spend on patrol. Enforcing claims far from the mainland in times of crisis requires the type of range and speed that the Su-35 possesses. The Su-35 is likely meant to help enforce China’s territorial claims, further deter regional claimants, and provide additional layers of protection in the case of escalation. The key to this is fuel.

Comments
112
rodney
January 1, 2014 at 20:31

peter wood’s emphasis on the south china sea is telling as he completely neglects china’s first area of strategic concern, that being, the east china sea.

the east china sea, out to the first island chain, is significantly more fundamental to china’s defensive strategy than is the south china sea, which is more an offensive, or expansionist, consideration. consequently, the ability to defend that space by extending air defense networks, and capacities, out to the first island chain, is their primary strategic consideration. hence their emphasis on building type 052 ddgs on the “aegis” model, and on purchasing an aircraft with combat range and sensor range that achieve those capacities. it is only the successful control of the east china sea that will allow china to exert any naval power, including an expansion into the south china sea.

but, i’m not from australia, so paranoia doesn’t inform my analyses.

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 21, 2013 at 18:28

@ Aeropush,

You care to counter me? LOL.

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 18, 2013 at 19:04

@ MYK, Aeropush and F-35 advocates/fanboys

http://www.ausairpower.net/PDF-A/JSF-Issues+Problems-2011-Master.pdf

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 18, 2013 at 19:00

@ MYK, Aeropush and F-35 advocates/fanboys

Which would you consider a failed F-35 project to any people that is unproven, isn’t supportable, isn’t affordable, isn’t survivable and isn’t lethal?

My characterisation of the F-35 revealed accurate with updated information, a total full of understanding of the aircraft’s abilities of what it can’t bring to the table.

Obviously, I’ve studied and analysed the aircraft, up-to-date, a proper job on the F-35 and I definitely know a lot about the faults of this failed program.

Truth is, you’re as blind as the typical F-35. The F-35 is only partly through it’s development testing. If you actually followed the results, you’d know issues are still not being solved properly, costs are climbing handsomely and the aircraft will never progress quite nicely. It will be outclassed well into the future.

But feel free to live in the forward blinded by the ridiculously biased baloney propaganda.

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 18, 2013 at 18:38

@ MYK and to all pro-F-35 advocates/fanboys,

“The Chinese J-31 copycat of the F-35 in which the PLAAF won’t even purchase for its own use.”

The PLAN will be using the J-31s for their carrier use.

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 18, 2013 at 18:35

@ MYK and to all pro-F-35 advocates

They will be exports for the J-31, at the moment it’s unknown who buys the aircraft because at the moment it’s still undergoing test trials.

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 15, 2013 at 15:18

What’s really amazing is how these wumaos still claim the F-35 is the right aircraft, yet no matter how many countries committed to this “Flying Pentagon Pork” programme and buying it in numbers! It is a still a failed project.

Besides the idea of the “fifth-generation” term being nothing more than thana marketing, in order for Welsh’s statement to be true vs. air-to-air, a final…working…post SDD F-35 would have to take on and BEAT, two Western reference threats we already have:

The F-22 as the PAK-FA and the Typhoon as the Su-35.

The F-35 will be unable to survive emerging threats. It is only effective against the most common threat systems of the era past – “legacy Soviet Cold War era weapons”. If the mission is to take on anti-access & area denial threat environment, the F-35 is unable to do it and will get shot down. The aircraft is too expensive to own and operate for lessor threats. If the mission is anything else, current aircraft like the F-15, F-16, F/A-18 and A-10 are more than enough.

There are significant development problems with this aircraft and will certainly continue to develop more and more problems when the F-35 becomes operational in 2018 or later.

Facts speaks for itself MYK, Jean-Paul, PKCasimir & other pro-F-35 advocates/fanboys as to look at why the F-35 can’t cut it on the modern battlefield etc.

MYK
December 16, 2013 at 04:06

Answer the question!

How many countries are buying the F-35 again, and answer how many countries are purchasing the cheaper J-31 from China?

Answer: 8 to 9 countries are buying the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, compared to 0 sales of the J-31 by China! Japan, Singapore, Australia, and now South Korea have selected the F-35, making it a four for four sweep in Asia so far for the F-35. China equals a big fat Z-E-R-O!

Your own PLAAF isn’t even purchasing the J-31 for its own air force, so why would anyone buy a stealth jet from China that’s not even good enough for Chicom air force? For the Chinese to say the J-31 is for export only, is telling that your indigenous aircraft creations ala copycats aren’t up to the challenge of western fighters. And that’s why the Chinese need to buy more advanced fighters like the SU-35 from the Russians to copy!

Facts are facts!

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 18, 2013 at 18:26

@ MYK and to all pro-F-35 advocates/fanboys

Why don’t you answer the question!

Answer: No matter how many countries like Japan, Singapore, Australia, and now South Korea or whoever commits to this “Flying Pentagon Pork” programme and buying it in numbers! Again it is a still a failed project.

Also, the F-35 will have no internal “dogfight” air-to-air missiles; the helmet doesn’t work; the software is not reliable; the F-35 lacks performance compared to peer threats or their Western analogy (the F-22 and Typhoon.). If the jet is a B or C, it may have left the deck that day without a gun.

The F-35 is detectable.

The F-35 is not a true “fifth-generation” fighter. It isn’t supportable. It isn’t affordable. It isn’t survivable. It isn’t lethal (because of the other points).

Finally, people like you are extremely unreliable at making sure America and the allies can maintain air supremacy. Your statements on the F-35, getting rid of the A-10, and the dumb long-shot…getting rid of the KC-10, verify that lack sensible air power thinking needed to protect our forces in a war.

Facts are facts!

Looks like you can’t even realise you are already lost the argument before it even got started!

MYK
December 16, 2013 at 04:17

Which would you consider a failed project people?

The Chinese J-31 copycat of the F-35 in which the PLAAF won’t even purchase for its own use, and now say the J-31is only for export sales with Zero buyers?

OR

The F-35 which has 8 to 9 countries purchasing the stealth fighter, including a four for four purchase sweep in Asia by Japan, Singapore, Australia, and South Korea?

Looks like ‘Another Guest’ can’t even realize he already lost the arguement before it even got started!

australia
March 31, 2014 at 13:22

first of all, i have researched the F-35. and second, u cant really say much about it as a fighter till it is one, The F-35 is only partly through it’s development testing. but, the advanced su-35s are almost ALMOST as good as the F-35. but without the stealth, and also the F-35 is a stealth aircraft, the su-35s is not, meaning that it is not confined in what it can do, ( the F-35 is limited in its combatant roles as it has to maintain its stealth capability) however, the PAK-FA T-50 is supposed to be the Russian counter to the F-22. and according to Russia will be more then capable of countering the F-35.

i wouldn’t underestimate the F-35. however for Australia.I just don’t think that it is the right choice. and that it will put Australia at a hugh disadvantaged if there ever is a open war directed at Australia. i think that Australia needs a open combatant fighter plane, with interceptor capability, for the defense of Australia. we would only need maybe two squads of these planes. long range planes, like the F-22 (pa-posed long range veriest), or the PAK-FA T-50. have a large number of very good (but doesn’t have to be the best, just better then the likely plane that it will encounter) fighter type planes, like the su-35s like what the f-18 hornets represent to Australia right now. as well as a good number of planes “like” the su-32, or the su-34 witch are pretty much the same plane. (look it up) but they could almost replace the capabilities that we lost with the f-111s as the su-32/34 are long range fighter/bombers. with a focus on naval capability, meaning that it is just what Australia is looking for.

Don’t get me wrong, im not some anti-American person. but i just don’t beleave that the F-35 is the type of plane that Australia should be investing so heavenly in.

Aeropush
December 17, 2013 at 02:54

Your characterization of the F-35 reveals the typical lack of accurate, updated information, a total lack of understanding of the aircraft’s abilities and what it brings to the table. Obviously, you’ve watched those old, outdated, ridiculously biased hack job utube videos on the 35 and now you think you actually know a little about the program. Truth is, you’re as blind as the typical 35 basher. The 35 is only partly through it’s development testing. If you actually followed the program, you’d know issues are being solved, costs are coming down and the aircraft is progressing quite nicely. It will be a game changer well into the future. But feel free to live in the past blinded by the propagandists.

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 21, 2013 at 17:38

@ Aeropush, MYK and other pro-F-35 advocates/fanboys,

According to our estimates manoeuvrability F-35 corresponds to the fighters of the 3rd generation. The F-35 has virtually no chance of winning.

Such super-manoeuvrable fighters brand “Suhoy”, as the Su-35 or Su-30MKI 4++ generation will keep convincing win over the F-35 in the demonstration of the fighting. Russia at every opportunity proposes to hold demonstrations fights, but USA each timefinds a reason to refuse under various pretexts.

Russia is ready to put the Su-35 against the F-35 to beat him in a demonstrative fight and increase the export of fighters of “Su” brand in other countries. If our fighters of the 4++ generation will confidently beat your “Fat Pregnant Pig” JSF (Joke Still Flying), it will allow to strengthen our leading position on the export of fighters in the world.

Vladimir Putin called fighters brand “Suhoy” the best in the world. We are ready to challenge, but your country will not take such risk. It will be a massive blow to the prestige of Lockheed Martin and It would certainly hit the rating of the B.H.Obama.

It should be noted that fighters brand “Su” 4++ generation is much cheaper.

Also the PAK-FA will kick the F-35′s big fat butt as well, which will also be another massive blow to the prestige of Lockheed Martin and It would certainly hit another rating of the B.H.Obama.

http://www.aviationweek.com/Portals/aweek/media/stealth_rm/stealth.html

http://www.ausairpower.net/APA…

http://www.ausairpower.net/APA…

http://www.democracyarsenal.or…

http://www.nationaldefensemaga…

http://www.marketing.org.au/Th…

australia
April 3, 2014 at 08:52

yeah no… i have researched the F-35 very heavily. and although i do have respect for the plane, the main variant is the F-35B while Australia, “yes i am basing this on Australian needs” is only buying the F-35A which although is still a very capable plane. will only take over the role of the F-18 A/B planes, and witch although over land the F-35A might still be a very good plane. so for a country like Israel or turkey it might be a very good plane, for a country like Australia, whose land mass is Inness and is a island country, so any threat would come from the sea. the F-35 shouldn’t be used over anything other then coastal seas. and simply does not have the range to reach Indonesia. which is the only constant posable threat. and Australia would still need such range to counter other threat such as a large fleet of ships before they get within a unacceptable threat range of Australia. and the F-35 is very limited for that role anyway. with limited capabilities for even air to air combat. witch is the main role of the F-18 A/B, and for air to surface roles, such as strikes agents ships, yes the F-35A has those capabilities but with modern war ships having defensive systems in place o counter such threats, and the same with modern front line aircraft, the F-35 in my opinion should have more then maybe 4 anti-ship missiles. and so i just don’t think that the F-35 is the right plane for Australia.

MYK
December 15, 2013 at 03:53

No matter how you look at the situation, China having to purchase the SU-35 from the Russians basically tells me the Chicoms still lack a reliable indigenous aircraft industry. The current Chinese fighter development program through ‘Receive & Duplicate’ hasn’t worked out at all for the copycat industies of China.

What’s really amazing is how these wumaos still claim the F-35 is junk, yet there are now 7 to 9 countries buying the F-35! China’s own version of the F-35 has no buyers what-so-ever, and even funnier, the J-31 isn’t even good enough for the PLAAF, as the stealth jet J-31 is for export only according to the Chinese military.

Facts speaks for itself ‘Keys’ & ‘Another Guest’ as look at the number of buyers of the F-35, while China’s J-31 has no buyers what-so-ever, and even the PLAAF isn’t buying the J-31 for it’s own military!

That speaks volumes in itself about China’s lack of a real indigenous fighter jet program……..by purchasing the SU-35!

Perhaps the Chinese should ask India & Russia for the PAK FA next to help bolster their stealth program?

Lee
December 14, 2013 at 08:58

reverse engineering su35. that’s what the Chinese are doing best in

Technocrat56
December 12, 2013 at 10:12

China does not export J-11 and has not sold the J-11 to any country. The Chinese can not manufacture the J-11 and its variants J-15, J-16 etc fast enough to satisfy its own needs.
The Russians have no buyers for the Su-35, they are pushing for the Chinese sale so the sale can be used to promote the Su-35. This tactic worked on the promotion of Su-27, Su-30 etc. using the Chinese sale.
The Chinese J-11B is superior to the Su-27 sold to China :
(1) Radar cross section of 3 square meters versus 15 sq m.
(2)Digital electronics with much faster processor versus analog electronics.
(3)Can launch precision-guided missiles versus can not.
(4)on-board oxygen generating system versus none
(5)Radar can track 8 and engage 4 targets simultaneously. and Etc.

australia
April 3, 2014 at 08:35

first of all, wow u are very very wrong. first point, most Asian country’s are buying the su-35. Indonesia has for a fact. and i don’t have to say any more, u are just that blatancy wrong.

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 6, 2013 at 11:43

@ Jean-Paul, PKCasimir, MYK and to the other pro-F-35 advocates/fanboys,

Read about the New Russian Air to Air Missile, AESA guided.

Bad News for U.S. Warplane Pilots: Russia’s New Dogfighting Missile Can’t Miss

https://medium.com/war-is-bori…

The only way to survive is to turn Fast & Hard, the failed Joke Still Flying can’t PERIOD!

https://medium.com/war-is-boring/2a5cd0edf210

Hao Li
December 31, 2013 at 07:32

One thing you missed here is engine, you know it’s important. Up to today, China still cannot finish the long delayed WS-10. Even the newest production of J10B and J11B in late 2013 are still with Russian engines. You are right, that 1st priority is to replace Mig21 (J7) or even Mig19 (J6) and Q5, these outdated aircrafts. But Russian agreed to supply more engines on the condition, that those airplanes are not for export.

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 4, 2013 at 20:01

@ Jean-Paul, PKCasimir and to the other pro-F-35 advocates/fanboys,

H3 MilSim – F-35A v Su-35S

Simulation showing F-35A vs Su-35S Pt 2 of 6

Aeropush
December 17, 2013 at 03:01

lol You can’t find a more updated video than this 3 year-old hack job of hypotheticals and inaccurate info to make your point? Try harder.

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 21, 2013 at 18:11

@ Aeropush

Yes I’ve heard of laser weapons. Again the F-35s stealth will be outdated. In 10-15 years you never see the F-35 with all sorts of new upgrades and designs.”

You have NO DAMN clue what you’re talking about.

How is the F-35 going to survive against the anti-access & area denial threat environment that is designed to be effective against the most common threat systems of that era past – legacy Soviet Cold War era weapons??? Come on answer that.

You should really try doing some research before you make a fool of yourself.

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 21, 2013 at 18:15

@ Aeropush,

Some Questions for Testing the datas, facts & the Evidence:

Why is DoD even considering the strategically obsolete F-35 given that the aircraft are absolutely inferior to the PAK-FA?

Why has DoD failed to address the PAK-FA and its future derivatives in any strategic planning?

Why has DoD not addressed “counter-stealth” capabilities in any strategic planning?

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 21, 2013 at 18:36

@ Aeropush,

Key Observations on the Data & Facts of the PAK-FA:

Development initiated during 1990s and well publicised in Russian media post 2000;

2016 IOC; flight test progressing very rapidly;

Designed from the outset to defeat the F-22 in close combat, match F-22 in long range supersonic combat, outperform F-22 in range/persistence;

Advanced second generation supercruise engine and high stealth rectangular nozzle in development;

High volume export production intended, planned replacement for established Flanker series fighters in global marketplace;

Advanced digital avionics: X-band radar modelled on F-22 APG-77, unique counter-stealth L-band radar, infrared sensor optimised for long range aerial combat, cockpit modelled on Su-35S, internal weapons, large internal fuel load, networked; Highly evolved aerodynamics & structure; “Extreme plus” agility;

The F-35 has no stealth advantage vs. PAK-FA and is grossly inferior to PAK-FA in sustained speed, altitude, agility, combat radius and weapons load payload;

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 3, 2013 at 18:00

@ Jean-Paul, PKCasimir and to the other pro-F-35 advocates/fanboys,

It does matter if the F-35s stealth will be outdated in 10-15 years time. In 10-15 years you will not see the F-35 with all sorts of new upgrades and designs.

Why?

Because the aircraft’s limitations are inherent to the design, they cannot be altered by incremental upgrades. The F-35 will be more than incapable for the next several decades at least.

MYK
December 4, 2013 at 17:16

If your really a ‘Another Guest from Australia’ then please answer why your countrymen are also ordering the F-35 like Japan, Singapore, and now South Korea? Guess you didn’t even know that Australia is/are also advocates/fanboys themselves of the F-35?

A real Aussie would know that fact, than a guy who really seems to be actually ‘Another Wumao Dang (from China)’ pretending to be from Australia!

As someone who keeps up with ‘Australia’s White Paper’, I suppose you also didn’t know that the Frigate HMAS Sydney will now be the first allied ship from Australia to be ported at Yokosuka Harbor in Japan & assigned to the US Seventh Fleet Carrier Strike Group to play a key role in patrolling the Senkaku islands as well.

Don’t forget that Australia & New Zealand have stated that if China starts a war with the US, they will have no choice but to also declare war on China under mutual defense pact agreement with the USA!

A real Aussie citizen would know this!!!

Keys
December 5, 2013 at 02:24

@MYK, Australia is not set to buy the F-35. It can pull out any time it wants. F-35′s airworthiness is NOT decided by who the proponents or buyers are, but by plain, cold science and engineering performance parameters. Your propaganda skills leave a lot to be desired. You are wasting our time, MYK. You should repeat high school a few more times.

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 5, 2013 at 19:09

@ MYK

Singapore is purchasing more F-15s. I don’t think you saw the article I posted earlier.

http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/singapores-rsaf-decides-to-fly-like-an-eagle-01141/

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 5, 2013 at 19:38

@ MYK,

I agree with Keys you should repeat high school a few more times, rather than drinking the Kool-Aid a.k.a. believing the rubbish statements from Lockheed Martin, generals and bureaucrats “the F-35 right warplane, affordable, very stealthy, extremely lethal and a truly 5th Generation Fighter” propaganda.

http://www.marketing.org.au/Thana_Marketing__The_dark_side_of_marketing_strategy_A1120.aspx

carl ward
April 3, 2014 at 09:08

@ MYK first of all, i do agree with u. but second of all i am only stating the purpose of the F-35A is to Australia. and although yes the F-35A will be a very good plane, it is a stealth plane, and a bomber/fighter plane, not just a fighter plane. and what Australia needs is a few squads of air-superiority planes, and the very best because of Australia small military we have to go for the advantage of having better tech. on the world stage not just in our area. like the F-18 were the best plane in the area, now they are outdated in only a few years after we got them, because Asia did just import the best planes that they could, witch is the su-35 at the moment for fighter planes. but i have gotten off topic. the F-35 is not the best plane for Australia. however for the role it is placed in it could be a OK plane for Australia, not the best but ok. but we would need to support the f-35 with other planes, as well as cover our other needs, where as other planes would do all that without as much support. also, Australia needs a long range plane, for just how big Australia is. and the F-35 is not a long range plane. its a good plane but its just not the right plane.

Aeropush
December 17, 2013 at 03:22

“It does matter if the F-35s stealth will be outdated in 10-15 years time. In 10-15 years you will not see the F-35 with all sorts of new upgrades and designs.”

Ever heard of laser weapons, block 4A and 4B upgrades to electronic warfare, communications, weapons, and sensors, a modular enhanced F135/new engine, etc.? Son, you really don’t have a clue. You should really try doing some research before you make a fool of yourself.

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 21, 2013 at 18:25

@ Aeropush,

You should repeat high school a few more times, rather than drinking too much Kool-Aid a.k.a. believing the rubbish statements from Lockheed Martin, generals and bureaucrats “the F-35 right warplane, affordable, very stealthy, extremely lethal and a truly 5th Generation Fighter” baloney propaganda.

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 21, 2013 at 18:43

@ Aeropush,

Welsh, you and other pro-F-35 advocates/fanboys statements on the F-35 make “analysis” the same quality as that of the model aeroplane glue sniffing brigade.

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 3, 2013 at 17:52

@ Jean-Paul, PKCasimir and to the other pro-F-35 advocates/fanboys,

The more you are trying to protect the F-35 and speeding the process of the failed programme the worse off the United States and the allies by eroding the air force which is going to make the western nations totally ineffective in the next 30 to 40 years.

That is the reason why the aircraft is given a nickname called the “Joke Still Flying”. All its about is to spend money and that is a mission of the aeroplane it’s for the US Congress to send money to Lockheed Martin to produce this “fat pregnant pig”. That’s a “real mission” for the aeroplane to fail any combat mission requirements that can’t do air superiority, deep interdiction bombing and close air support roles.

http://www.ausairpower.net/PDF-A/JSF-Issues+Problems-2011-Master.pdf

Another Guest (from Australia)
December 3, 2013 at 17:28

@ Jean-Paul, PKCasimir and to the other pro-F-35 advocates/fanboys,

Also care to counter Winslow Wheeler, Pierre Sprey and Bill Sweetman’s analysis line by line? LOL.

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